Saving in the Laundry Room

Posted May 27 2020, 10:00 AM PDT by Sandy Dodge

Saving in the Laundry Room

Posted in Living by Sandy Dodge

Image Source: Shutterstock

 

When it comes to household expenses, staying at home has brought about savings in some areas, while increasing expenses in others. The laundry room has likely seen an uptick in usage, with its associated costs following suit. Save your energy and money by keeping these tips in mind as we continue to adapt to being home more often.

 

Master your machine settings

Review the owner’s manuals for your washer and dryer. There may very well be energy-saving settings you’re not using. For example, your washer’s “high-speed” or “extended wash” cycles will remove more moisture, which can help reduce drying time. A dryer’s “cool down cycle” allows clothes to finish drying using only residual heat.

 

Think twice before washing

Once you’re aware of the costs associated with washing and drying, and the natural resources this consumes, you may decide you don’t need to launder certain clothes as often – which can also extend the life of these garments. Some clothing, like jeans, sweatshirts, and sweatpants, can be worn a few times without a cleaning. Washing these items only when necessary will help you cut down. Another tip – keep another laundry basket in your room for those lightly worn clothes that you could wear again, so they keep separate from your clean clothes.

 

Use hot water only when necessary

Using warm water instead of hot can significantly cut down your washer’s energy expense. Using cold water puts less pressure on electricity grids, saving your household even more money and energy. Cold water washes are less likely to shrink or fade your clothing as well. To ensure your clothes still get clean, try using a cold-water detergent.

 

Right-size your loads

For both washing and drying, taking into consideration the size of your load can factor greatly into your savings. No matter the size of the load you wash, it costs the same amount to run a cycle. So instead of doing two small loads, wait until you have one large load. When drying, keep in mind that an overly full dryer will take longer to dry the clothes. A dryer with too few items inside costs more to operate.

 

Clean the dryer vent and filter

When the lint filter in your dryer gets clogged, airflow is reduced, and the dryer can’t operate effectively. Make a point to clean the filter after every use. If you use dryer sheets, scrub the filter every month to remove any film buildup. The venting that attaches to the back of your dryer also needs to be kept clean and clear.

 

Air dry

When the weather is sunny and warm, consider putting your clothes out to hang-dry. Doing so will keep your drying expenses to a minimum. It can also be a better drying method for clothing with delicate tailoring.

 

With staying at home being the new status quo, taking a look at the ways our homes use energy and incur expenses is more relevant than ever. These small changes in the laundry room are just some of the minor adjustments you can make in your household during these unique times.


Posted on May 28, 2020 at 3:18 pm
Dana Myers | Posted in Uncategorized |

10 Tips to Minimize Stress When Selling Your Home

When I was growing up, my family must have moved a dozen times. After the first few moves, we had it down to a science: timed out, scheduled, down to the last box. Despite our best efforts, plans would change, move-out and move-in days would shift, and the experience would stress the entire family out. Despite the stress, we always managed to settle in our new home and sell our old one before the start of school.

 

With a lot of planning and scheduling, you can minimize the stress of selling your house and moving. Here are some tips:

Plan Ahead

Know when you want to be moved out and into your new home and have a backup plan in case it falls through. Before you sell your home, familiarize yourself with local and state laws about selling a home so you’re not caught by surprise if you forget something important.

Lists and schedules are going to be your new best friend through the process. Have a timetable for when you want to sell your house when you have appraisers, realtors, movers, etc. over. Also, keep one for when your things need to be packed and when you need to be moved into the new place. I suggest keeping it on an Excel sheet so you can easily update it as the timeline changes (and it will – stuff happens).

Use Resources

First time selling a house? Check out some great resources on what you need to know. US News has excellent, step-by-step guides on what you need to know to sell. Appraisers and realtors can also be good resources, and since you’ll be working with them through the process, be sure to ask them questions or have them point you to resources.

Appraisal

Have your house appraised before you sell so you know your budget for your new home. This will help you look for an affordable home that meets your family’s needs. It will also help you maximize the amount you can receive for your old home. You can also learn useful information from an appraisal, such as which repairs need to be made, if any.

Repairs

Does your house need repairs before you move? If so, figure out whether you’ll be covering them, or whether your buyers will (this will be a part of price negotiations, so factor it in with your home budget). Will you need to make repairs in your new house, or will that be covered? Either way, make sure you know which repairs need to be made – and either be upfront with buyers about them or make them before you sell.

Prepare to Move

If you’re moving to a new town or a new state, you need to prepare more than just a new home. Research doctors and dentists, places to eat, and what to do for fun. If you have school-aged children, look at the local school district or private school options – not only to learn how to enroll your kids, but also to get a feel for the school culture, see what extracurricular activities your kids can do, what standards/learning methods your kids’ new school will implement, etc.

Packing

Think: how soon are you moving, what will you need to use before you move, what can get boxed and what needs to stay out?  The sooner you’re moving out, the sooner you need to pack, but if you have time, just take a day per weekend to organize a room, pack what you want to take and arrange to donate what you want to get rid of.

Downsizing

Moves are a great time to purge old, unwanted and unused stuff from your home. Sometimes, it’s necessary if you’re moving into a smaller space. Either way, as you pack each room, think about whether you use what you’re packing to take with you. If you do, pack it to go. If not, put it in a separate box to go to your local donations place. You can also call some organizations to have your unwanted things picked up, no hassle.

If You Have Kids

Moving with kids can be extra stressful. Be sure to include them in the process. This is a wonderful opportunity to teach younger children about moving and prepare them for the changes it brings. Older children can help out with responsibilities, like packing their room or researching their new town.

Your New Place

Moving into a new place takes some planning as well. Once you’ve bought your new home or condo, design at least a basic outline for where your stuff will be set up. Make necessary repairs and decorate (painting, for example) before you unpack. Ideally, you should have some time to do these things before, but if you don’t, don’t be in a hurry to unpack everything – it can be a hassle to paint if you have all your furniture and bookshelves up!

Staying In Touch and Making New Friends

Finally, moving can mean good-byes with family and/or friends. Social media is a great way to keep in touch with people after you’ve moved, but distance can still weaken these old relationships. Make some time to call or message your old friends to keep in touch. Pair that work with a concerted effort to meet new people. See what hobbies or groups are in your new area and start there. It doesn’t seem like a lot, but it can make your new house a home and make your new town a community you can enjoy.

 

Patrick Bailey is a professional writer mainly in the fields of mental health, addiction, and living in recovery. Patrick is currently a writer for Mountain Springs Recovery as well as on his own blog.


Posted on May 15, 2020 at 2:04 pm
Dana Myers | Posted in Uncategorized |

Neighbors in Need Raises $690,000 for Food Banks

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected populations across the globe, but those who struggle with poverty and count on food programs to meet their basic day-to-day needs are in an especially uncertain place. While coping with increased demand and a bottlenecked pipeline of food supply, food banks are desperate for funds to continue to serve their communities. Because of this, Windermere decided to challenge its offices to raise $250,000, every dollar of which would be matched by the Windermere Foundation and donated to food banks in the areas where Windermere operates. We titled it the “Neighbors in Need” fundraising campaign.

Neighbors in Need kicked off on April 21, with the goal of raising $250,000 by May 5. As word continued to spread, online donations and contributions from both our agents and the public began to increase. Neighbors in Need was given a boost by Seattle Seahawks starting safety Quandre Diggs in a heartfelt message encouraging support. Over the final 24 hours, leading up to the May 5 deadline, support poured in from across the Windermere family as the final figure exceeded the initial goal of $500,000, landing at a total of $690,000.

Neighbors in Need exemplifies Windermere’s deep commitment to supporting our local communities, which traces back to 1989 when the Windermere Foundation first started. Since then, we’ve proudly raised more than $41 million for low-income and homeless families throughout the Western U.S.

On behalf of the Windermere Foundation to all those who joined the effort: Thank you. We could not have made this large of an impact without your help. We are humbled to be able to do our part to help those who need it most during these uncertain times.

 


Posted on May 14, 2020 at 3:15 pm
Dana Myers | Posted in Uncategorized |

Matthew Gardner Weekly COVID-19 Housing & Economic Update

Posted April 6 2020, 11:00 AM PDT by Matthew Gardner, Chief Economist, Windermere Real Estate

Matthew Gardner Weekly COVID-19 Housing & Economic Update: 4/6/2020

Posted in Market News by Matthew Gardner, Chief Economist, Windermere Real Estate

In the latest episode of “Mondays with Matthew”, Windermere Chief Economist Matthew Gardner dives into part one of his two-part series analyzing the mortgage market. Today’s focus is on the substantial impact COVID-19 has had on jumbo mortgages. Check back next week when he’ll discuss conventional mortgages and provide his latest interest rate forecast.


Posted on April 13, 2020 at 4:48 pm
Dana Myers | Posted in Uncategorized |

Your Beginner’s Guide to Home Appraisals

Posted in Buying and Selling by Meaghan McGlynn

 

Appraisals are used as a reliable, independent valuation of a tract of land and the structure on it, whether it’s a house or a skyscraper. Designed to protect buyers, sellers, and lending institutions, appraisals are an important part of the buying/selling process.

Below, you will find information about the appraisal process, what goes into them, their benefits and some tips on how to help make an appraisal go smoothly and efficiently.

 

Appraisal value vs. market value

The appraiser’s value is determined by using a combination of factors such as comparative market analyses and their inspection of the property to determine if the listing price is typical for the area.

Market value, on the other hand, is what a buyer is willing to pay for a home or what homes of comparable value are selling for.

If you are in the process of setting the price of your home, you can gain some peace-of-mind by consulting an independent appraiser. Show them comparative values for your neighborhood, relevant documents, and give them a tour of your home, just as you would show it to a prospective buyer.

 

What information goes into an appraisal?

Professional appraisers consult a range of information sources, including multiple listing services, county tax assessor records, county courthouse records, and appraisal data records, in addition to talking to local real estate professionals.

They also conduct an inspection. Typically, an appraiser’s inspection focuses on:

  • The condition of the property and home, inside and out.
  • The home’s layout and features.
  • Home updates.
  • Overall quality of construction.
  • Estimate of the home’s square footage (the gross living area “GLA”; garages and unfinished basements are estimated separately).
  • Permanent fixtures (for example, in-ground pools, as opposed to above-ground pools).

After the inspection, the appraiser of a typical single-family home will create their report including their professional opinion on what the price of the home should be.

You might hear the lender ask for two reports, the “Sales Comparison Approach” and the “Cost Approach.” These two approaches use different methodologies to find the appropriate value of the home, and help the lender confirm the home’s price.

 

Who pays and how long does it take?

The buyer usually pays for the appraisal unless they have negotiated otherwise. Depending on the lender, the appraisal may be paid in advance or incorporated into the application fee; some are due on delivery and some are billed at closing. Typical costs range from $275-$600, but this can vary from region to region.

An inspection usually takes anywhere from 15 minutes to several hours, depending on the size and complexity of your property. In addition, the appraiser spends time pulling up county records for the values of the houses around you. A full report is sent to your loan officer, real estate agent, and/or lender in about a week.

If you are the seller, you won’t get a copy of an appraisal ordered by a buyer. Under the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, however, the buyer has the right to get a copy of the appraisal if they request it. Typically, the requested appraisal is provided at closing.

 

What if the appraisal is too low?

A low appraisal can present a problem when there’s a large difference between what you’ve agreed to pay and the appraisal price.

Usually, the seller’s agents and the buyer’s agent will respond by looking for recent sold and pending listings of comparable homes. Sometimes this can influence the appraisal. If the final appraisal is well below what you have agreed to pay, you can re-negotiate the contract or cancel it.

 

Where do you find a qualified appraiser?

Your bank or lending institution will find and hire an appraiser; Federal regulatory guidelines do not allow borrowers to order and provide an appraisal to a bank for lending purposes. If you want an appraisal for your own personal reasons and not to secure a mortgage or buy a homeowner’s insurance policy, you can do the hiring yourself. You can contact your lending institution and they can recommend qualified appraisers and you can choose one yourself or you can call your local Windermere Real Estate agent and they can make a recommendation for you. Once you have the name of some appraisers you can verify their status on the Federal Appraisal Subcommittee website.

 

Tips for hassle-free appraisals:

To ensure the appraisal process is smooth and efficient, provide your appraiser with the information and documents he or she needs to get the job done. The documents you will need include:

  • A brief explanation of why you’re getting an appraisal
  • The date you’d like your appraisal to be completed
  • A copy of your deed, survey, purchase agreement, or other papers that pertain to the property
  • A sketch of the property with the property’s dimensions. These are usually available online from the county assessors.
  • If you have a mortgage, provide the information about your lender, the year you got your mortgage, the amount, the type of mortgage (FHA, VA, etc.), your interest rate, and any additional financing you have.
  • A copy of your current real estate tax bill, statement of special assessments, balance owing and on what (for example, sewer, water)
  • Tell your appraiser if your property is listed for sale and if so, your asking price and listing agency.
  • If it’s a multiple offer situation, provide the appraiser with the other offers to prove the demand for the home.
  • Any personal property that is included in the sale, like appliances and other fixtures.
  • If you’re selling an income-producing property, a breakdown of income and expenses for the last year or two and a copy of leases.
  • A copy of the original house plans and specifications.
  • A list of recent improvements and their costs.
  • Any other information you feel may be relevant.

By doing your homework, compiling the information your appraiser needs, and providing it at the beginning of the process, you can minimize unnecessary delays.


Posted on March 9, 2020 at 2:56 pm
Dana Myers | Posted in Uncategorized |

Colorado Real Estate Market Update

 

The following analysis of the Metro Denver & Northern Colorado real estate market is provided by Windermere Real Estate Chief Economist Matthew Gardner. We hope that this information may assist you with making better-informed real estate decisions. For further information about the housing market in your area, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

 

ECONOMIC OVERVIEW

Colorado’s economy added 57,100 new non-agricultural jobs over the past 12 months, a growth rate of 2.1%. The pace of job growth has been moderating and I anticipate this trend will continue as we move through 2020. My current forecast is for Colorado to add around 57,000 new jobs in 2020, a growth rate of 2.1%.

In November, the state unemployment rate was 2.6%, down a full percentage point from the same month in 2018. Unemployment rates in all the counties contained in this report were lower than a year ago and it is fair to state that all markets are now at full employment.

 

HOME SALES

  • In the final quarter of 2019, 14,279 homes sold, representing an impressive increase of 9.2% compared to the final quarter of 2018. However, sales were 18.7% lower than the third quarter, which I attribute to seasonality. Pending sales — a sign of future closings — dropped 26.7% compared to the third quarter, suggesting that closings in the first quarter of 2019 are likely to come in below current levels.
  • It is notable that all counties contained in this report saw sales growth compared to the same period a year ago.
  • Listing activity in the quarter essentially matched the same period in 2018 but the number of homes for sale was 26% lower than in the third quarter of the year. Again, this is a function of seasonality.
  • Inventory levels are holding steady, and demand for housing continues to be strong. I would certainly like to see inventory levels rise and I remain modestly hopeful that this will be the case, but likely not until the second half of 2020.

 

 

HOME PRICES

  • Home prices continue to trend higher, with the average home price in the region rising 4.3% year-over-year to $473,264.
  • Interest rates remain at very competitive levels and are likely to stay below 4% through 2020. This will allow prices to continue to rise, though I expect more modest price growth if there is an increase in the number of homes for sale.
  • Appreciation was strongest in Boulder County, where prices rose 7.4%. Home prices dropped in Clear Creek, Park, and Gilpin counties, but these are small markets so I don’t believe it’s indicative of an ongoing trend.
  • Affordability remains an issue in many Colorado markets and this will act as a modest headwind to ongoing price growth.

 

 

 

DAYS ON MARKET

  • The average number of days it took to sell a home in the markets contained in this report rose three days compared to the final quarter of 2018.
  • The amount of time it took to sell a home rose in all counties other than Clear Creek when compared to the fourth quarter of 2018.
  • It took an average of 41 days to sell a home in the region, an increase of 11 days compared to the third quarter of this year.
  • The Colorado housing market is still performing well and the modest increase in the length of time it took to sell a home is not a concern at the present time.

 

 

CONCLUSIONS

This speedometer reflects the state of the region’s real estate market using housing inventory, price gains, home sales, interest rates, and larger economic factors.

For the fourth quarter of 2019, I am leaving the needle at the same level as in the third quarter. Listing activity has not grown, and this has led to higher prices in general. Although market time has risen, the market still favors home sellers.

 

 

ABOUT MATTHEW GARDNER

As Chief Economist for Windermere Real Estate, Matthew Gardner is responsible for analyzing and interpreting economic data and its impact on the real estate market on both a local and national level. Matthew has over 30 years of professional experience both in the U.S. and U.K.

In addition to his day-to-day responsibilities, Matthew sits on the Washington State Governors Council of Economic Advisors; chairs the Board of Trustees at the Washington Center for Real Estate Research at the University of Washington; and is an Advisory Board Member at the Runstad Center for Real Estate Studies at the University of Washington where he also lectures in real estate economics.


Posted on March 6, 2020 at 5:02 pm
Dana Myers | Posted in Uncategorized |

Designing Your Home Office

Working from home is an aspiration for many of us, but to do so effectively takes effort. A disorganized space at home can be just as troublesome as a hectic office. The most disciplined telecommuters will tell you that you need a structured routine and organization in order to be successful.

Having a designated workspace is one of the most important elements to your success when you make the switch to telecommuting. Even if you live in a small space, you need to find a balance between home and office. People who work from home often have a difficult time separating their work hours from their non-work hours because it’s so easy to keep at it late into the night. But maintaining a balance and shutting down the computer is important for overall wellbeing. What are some other must-haves for a successful home office? Here are the top five:

 

  1. Natural Light – Study upon study tells us that natural light is needed to boost productivity and mood. Make sure to set your desk up as close to a window as you can. If being near a window isn’t an option, a natural light lamp is the next best thing. It helps balance your body clock and leaves you feeling rested and refreshed.
  2. To-Do List or Planner – Start each day off by making a to-do list outlining what you need to get done before the end of the workday. Make sure to set a realistic time frame in which all of that should be completed, so you can check each one off the list and feel immense accomplishment once you’ve completed them all.
  3. Storage – If you have a big enough space, put in a large bookshelf where you can organize everything (think storage boxes). It reduces clutter and looks stylish. Using your walls and cabinetry is the most efficient use of space.
  4. Calendar – Many people tend to rely on digital calendars these days because of their convenience. When all of your devices sync together and pop up with reminders, you never have to worry about missing an appointment. However, many people find that it helps to keep a paper calendar handy too so you can easily view your whole month at a glance. Choose which options works best for you by playing with both options, or something in between and see which one lets you be more productive with the least amount of stress.
  5. Space for Inspiration – It doesn’t matter what field you work in, having a source of inspiration in your workspace is essential. Whether it’s a photo of your family, your dream car, or that vacation you’ve been dying to take, having that inspiration right in front of you provides a constant reminder of why you do what you do.

Posted February 24 2020, 10:00 AM PST by Meaghan McGlynn


Posted on March 4, 2020 at 10:26 pm
Dana Myers | Posted in Uncategorized |

Finding Your New Home in Four Steps

 

Whether you’re a first-time homebuyer or you currently own and are looking for a new home, the ideas below will help you better navigate that all-important first step: Finding a property that is both appealing and affordable.

 

The search for a new home always starts out with a lot of excitement. But if you haven’t prepared, frustration can soon set in, especially in a competitive real estate market. The biggest mistake is jumping into a search unfocused, just hoping to “see what’s available.” Instead, we recommend you first take some time to work through the four steps below.

 

Step 1: Talk to your agent

Even if you’re just thinking about buying or selling a house, start by consulting your real estate agent. An agent can give you an up-to-the-minute summary of the current real estate market, as well as mortgage industry trends. They can also put you in touch with all the best resources and educate you about the next steps, plus much more. If you are interested in finding an experienced agent in your area, we can connect you here.

 

Step 2: Decide how much home you can afford

It may sound like a drag to start your home search with a boring financial review, but when all is said and done, you’ll be glad you did. With so many people competing to buy what is available, it’s far more efficient to focus your search on the properties you can afford. A meeting or two with a reputable mortgage agent should tell you everything you need to know.

 

Step 3: Envision your future

Typically, it takes at least five years for a home purchase to start paying off financially—which means—the better your new home suits you, the longer you’ll most likely remain living there.

Thinking of your near future, what life events do you anticipate in the next five or six years? If you’re planning to add to the family or change careers, or even rent out a portion of your home to others, share this information with your real estate agent. They will be able to help you evaluate your current and future needs to help find the best home that you can grow into.

 

Step 4: Visualize your ideal home

When it comes to this step, be realistic. It’s easy to get carried away dreaming about all the home features you want. Try listing everything on a piece of paper, then choose the five “must-haves,” and the five “really-wants.”

For more tips, as well as advice geared specifically to your situation, connect with an experienced Windermere Real Estate agent by clicking here.

 

Posted March 2 2020, 10:05 AM PST by Sandy Dodge


Posted on March 3, 2020 at 9:09 pm
Dana Myers | Posted in Uncategorized |

Mortgage Rate Forecast

https://www.windermere.com/blogs/windermere/categories/economics-101-videos/posts/matthew-gardner-s-2020-mortgage-rate-forecast


Posted on February 21, 2020 at 5:35 pm
Dana Myers | Posted in Uncategorized |

Deciding to Sell

Posted December 31 2015, 1:00 PM PST by Tara Sharp

Practical Resolutions: Deciding to Sell (Part IV)

Posted in BuyingSelling, and Living by Tara Sharp

Choosing to put your house on the market is rarely easy, but if you must sell to move onto the next phase of your life, then you want to make sure your house is purchase-ready to get the most out of your investment. If you aren’t sure if you are ready to sell, you can always consider becoming a landlord or finding a property manager to handle tenants. But if you have decided to put your house on the market, it is time to let go of sentimentality and start thinking of it as a house again–not your home. Here are some tips for getting your house ready to sell and placing it on the market:

Do an audit: Go through the house, making notes of any projects that need to be completed, and anything that needs to be replaced, repainted or repaired. Here is a good checklist to get you started.  If you are unsure about any major problems, you may want to hire an inspector to look at your home prior to putting it on the market so you can fix all issues and avoid getting stuck in heavy negotiations.

Start with a blank canvas: Look at your home from the perspective of a potential buyer. You will want to neutralize your space so anyone interested in the house can see its full potential. Keep in mind that you may love your red wall, wall-to-wall carpet or lavish art, but others may find it hard to see beyond the decorations to imagine their own taste in the house. Neutralizing the space can be as easy as painting the walls a soft white, paring down possessions or scaling back on updates. Once your home is turn-key with the basics, start to think about the updates that will make the most difference in your return on investment.

Get the most bang for your buck: If you are considering upgrades to increase the value of your home, stick to projects that will make the most sense, such as increasing the curb appeal by re-painting or replacing an outdated front door and upgrading the landscaping with easy-to-maintain plants and pathways. The first impression your home makes on a buyer is key to selling your home quickly.  If your appliances are out-of-date, you may want to consider upgrading to energy-efficient models, which will appeal to a wider set of buyers. Avoid laying down new carpet; if the carpet needs replacing, consider wood flooring, as more people are replacing carpets with hardwood these days. Also keep in mind that your aesthetic will likely be different than those looking at your home, so avoid updates to the kitchen and bathroom that may offend the next homeowner. They will consider the need to replace these as a part of their offer. For more ideas on projects that bring a return, go here.

Find a listing agent: Once you are ready to put your home on the market, find a listing agent you trust will promote your home and bring the most return. Interview a number of agents to learn about their methods of marketing your home to other agents and potential buyers. They should be knowledgeable about the area, the market, comparable listings, staging and marketing techniques that will work best for you.  Look at potential agents’ past listings to see the techniques they employ, the photographs and language they use to market the homes, how long homes have been on market and what their listings look like.

Price your home to sell: Pricing your house right the first time will help it sell faster. The great news is there are plenty of buyers looking to purchase homes right now, and this trend should continue. The concern for many homeowners ready to sell is that their expectations for the selling price of the home will not necessarily be met. Increase your chances of getting your home off the market fast by working with your listing agent to price your home right. Your listing agent will factor in a number of considerations when helping you determine the best price for your home, including comparable homes that have sold in the area or similar locations, the type of home, neighborhood, condition, etc.

Staging: Now that you have gotten through most of the process for putting your home on the market, look at your home through fresh eyes. Staging your home is a fine balance between making your home inviting and setting a canvas for the next homeowner to envision the space with their stuff and to fit their life. Your home should look inhabited but clean, uncluttered but not sterile. Whether you work with a stager or do most of the set up yourself, you will have to get rid of the clutter and pare down all your belongings to the essential.

    • Thin out your closets; full closets look small.
    • Remove all personal items, photographs, trophies and excessive collections so prospective buyers can envision the home as theirs.
    • Pare down all your belongings to keep your home efficient and cleaning easy.
    • Pay attention to the details; you want your home to be welcoming in every way.

    Putting your home on the market can be stressful, but you can minimize stress by following these tips and other ideas for getting your home ready to sell. The better prepared you are prior to listing your home, the easier it will be to sell to prospective buyers. In the end, realistic expectations about how long it will take to prepare your home to go to market, what renovations will get you the best return, and what is the right price to motivate buyers will help your home sell quickly, saving you money in the long run.

     

    What are your home-related resolutions for 2016? How are you doing on reaching your goals?

    This is the last post in our four-part home resolution series. Read the previous posts on setting and sticking to resolutions ,making your house a home and buying a home.


    Posted on February 9, 2020 at 1:07 am
    Dana Myers | Posted in Uncategorized |